Summer Institute in Classical Languages

Learn a classical language amidst a community of scholars.

Often the question isn't “Why should I study a classical language?” but “When can I find the time?”  Since 1976 the University of Dallas Summer Program has provided the opportunity to study Greek and Latin outside the limits of the regular academic year.  Our summer learners include undergraduate and graduate students from our own and other institutions; high school teachers seeking accreditation, review, or deepening of knowledge; and a number of people who simply want to be able to study good books in the original language. High school students who have completed the junior year and will be 16 years old by July 1st are also encouraged to apply.

Admission

  • Applications are accepted up to the day of the first class meeting. 
  • For application forms, contact the Classics Department at (972) 721-4108, or the Braniff Graduate Office at (972) 721-5106, or Undergraduate Admissions at (972) 721-5266. 

Tuition

  • Undergraduates and special students: $465 per credit hour or $1,395 per 3-credit course
  • Graduate students and teachers may apply their tuition scholarships to these courses.
  • For information about the costs of these courses after the scholarships have been applied, please contact the Braniff Graduate Office at (972) 721-5106. 

Courses Offered

Summer I:

  • Latin 1301.  Elementary Latin I
  • Greek 1301.  Elementary Classical Greek I
  • Latin 3V50.  Selections from Latin Prose Authors

Summer II

  • Latin 1302.  Elementary Latin II
  • Greek 1302.  Elementary Classical Greek II

Schedule 

First Summer Session (June 6-July 8) 

Latin 1301.  Elementary Latin I.
STAFF.  3 credits.  MTWT 10:00-12:00.
The first half of introductory Latin grammar and syntax.  This course is a comprehensive introduction to the language of ancient Rome, particularly that of the first centuries B.C. and A.D, at the end of the second part of which good students are ready to read unadapted Latin prose of Caesar, Cicero, Livy and other authors of the first rank.

Greek 1301.  Elementary Classical Greek I.
STAFF  3 credits.  MTWT 2:00-4:00.
The first half of introductory Greek grammar and syntax.  This course is a comprehensive introduction to the language of ancient Greece, particularly that of the 5th and 4th century Athenians. This course is the very best way to obtain a reading knowledge of ancient Greek literature in the shortest time possible.  No prior experience with Greek (or any other language save English) is needed.

Latin 3V50.  Selections from Latin Prose Authors.
Dr. David Sweet.  3 credits.  MTWTF 11:00-1:00.
An upper level Latin course for high school teachers, advanced undergraduates and graduate students.  The course will read passages from the Res Gestae of Augustus, and from Tacitus, Livy and perhaps Pliny, the Younger.

Second Summer Session (July 11-August 12)

Latin 1302. Elementary Latin II.

STAFF.  3 credits.  MTWT 10:00-12:00

The second half of introductory Latin grammar and syntax.

Greek 1302.  Elementary Classical Greek II.

STAFF.  3 credits.  MTWT 2:00-4:00.
The second half of introductory Greek grammar and syntax.

 

 

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