Scholarships & Financial Aid

Explore your opportunities.

Students of the Braniff Graduate School of Liberal Arts may be eligible for various forms of financial assistance and scholarships. There is a small number of scholarships from University of Dallas available to students with a proven track record. Additionally, several organizations offer scholarship and fellowship opportunities which would be of interest to graduate students. 

  • The Intercollegiate Studies Institute offers several substantial fellowships for graduate schools students or applicants. These include the:
    • Richard M. Weaver Fellowship for future college-level teachers ($5000)
    • Salvatori Fellowship for scholars of the American Founding ($10,000)
    • Western Tradition Fellowship for students of the Western tradition ($20,000)
    • Renshaw Fellowship for students interested in shaping K-12 education ($12,000)
  • The Institute for Humane Studies Fellowship (up to $15,000)
  • The Charles T. Koch Foundation grant for dissertation proposals on the subject of "the institutions and ideas that foster societal well-being."

News

UD Community Rallies for Charity Week

On Friday, Oct. 13, Catholics around the world gathered to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Our Lady of Fatima, and as the UD community rallies for another Charity Week, we are reminded of our call to serve others. Starting Monday, Oct. 16, and lasting through Saturday, Oct. 21, the entire campus will raise funds for three nonprofits that align with the university's Catholic identity.

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Coming Home: Alumni & Family Weekend Is Fast Approaching

Alumni and Family Weekend (AFW) is the perfect time to reminisce over old memories and create new ones -- and if your graduation year ends in a 2 or a 7, to reunite with your classmates. This year, AFW is fast approaching: we'll officially kick off the festivities with TGIT on the night of Oct. 12.

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Clare Boothe Luce Lecturer Studies Nuclear Fusion: 'One of the Fundamental Forces in Nature'

The sun has been producing light for nearly five billion years, but where does its energy come from? As the mathematician and astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus first suggested, the sun rules the center of our solar system with a gravitational iron fist. Scientists since Copernicus have discovered that nuclear reactions in the sun's core generate energy to produce the light we see; those same reactions enable the production of elements in our universe that are heavier than hydrogen.

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