Degree Requirements

Classes available anytime, anywhere.

One of the prime advantages of the Satish & Yasmin Gupta College of Business at the University of Dallas is convenience for the working professional. Intermester classes which are held two evenings plus Saturdays for 3-4 weeks are also an option. The Gupta College of Business uses a trimester system, with fall, spring and summer terms. With year-round classes and multiple starting points each term, students can choose from 12-week, 6-week, or intermester classes.

For international students it is a distinct advantage to attend class with current working professionals in the field where you aspire to work.  Upon graduation, students may apply for the 12-month Optional Practical Training (OPT).

Master of Science (M.S.) in Business Analytics

The Masters of Science (MS) in Business Analytics is a 30 hour graduate program that incorporates the complexities of decision making using quantitative and qualitative data.  BANA 8395 Business Analytics Practicum serves as the final course in the program incorporating all elements of the degree.

30 Credit Hours / 10 Classes

Required Courses:
BUAD 8310. Business and Society.
BUAD 6305. The Effective Leader.
TECH 6360. Programming Concepts.
BANA 6350. Quantitative Methods.
BANA 6380. Data Management.
BANA 7320. Data Mining and Visualization.
BANA 7350. Forecasting Methods.
BANA 7365. Predictive Modeling.
BANA 7380. Advanced Business Analytics.
BANA 8395. Business Analytics Practicum.

MBA with a Concentration in Business Analytics

Students who complete the four specified Business Analytics electives below in addition to their MBA will receive a Concentration in Business Analytics designation on their transcript.

42 Credit Hours / 14 Classes

Required Core Curriculum:
ACCT 5323. Accounting for Managers.
BUAD 6300. Business Analytics.
BUAD 6305. The Effective Leader.
BUAD 8310. Business and Society.
BUAD 8390. The Capstone Experience.
FINA 6305. Managerial Finance.
MANA 6307. Managing Complex Organizations.
MANA 8320. Global Strategy.
MARK 6305. Value Based Marketing.
OPER 6305. Management of Operations.

Business Analytics Concentration:
BANA 6350. Quantitative Methods.
BANA 7320. Data Mining and Visualization.
BANA 7350. Forecasting Methods.
BANA 7380. Advanced Business Analytics.

Graduate Certificate in Business Analytics

18 Credit Hours / 6 Classes

TECH 6360. Programming Concepts.
BANA 6350. Quantitative Methods.
BANA 6380. Data Management.
BANA 7320. Data Mining and Visualization.
BANA 7350. Forecasting Methods.
BANA 7380. Advanced Business Analytics.


Prerequisites for all Business Analytics Programs

In order to ensure that all students come into the program with similar levels of statistics and SAS background, the prerequisites listed below are required for all business analytics programs:

Certifications:

Foundations Classes:

  • MANA 5F50. Foundations of Management and Strategy or equivalent.
  • MARK 5F50. Foundations of Marketing or equivalent.
  • TECH 5F70. Foundations of Information Technologies and Management or equivalent. 

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