NCECA

Heroes, Icons, History and Memory:

Dan Hammett, conference chair

It was such an honor to be your on site chair. There were many individuals who graciously contributed their time and energy to the conference. On behalf of the Texas community it was such a pleasure to welcome you to Texas. Each NCECA conference has a central theme, ours being Heroes, Icons, History, Memory. The history of NCECA is recorded with the works of its members. You are the most important record of its history. Chairing this conference is my way of repaying my years of wonderful memories. Giving of oneself to the organization, is a great way to honor it. After all, if you're not careful, you too might be an on site chair someday.

Hopefully this conference allowed the visual icons of our organization to become more visible and accessible to all of us and especially to the students. This was clearly marked by the Honors and Fellows exhibition at the Modern in Sundance Square. What a jewel! In honoring our fellows we honored ourselves. The images you had the opportunity to view in each of the 40 exhibitions during the conference should have clearly told you that ceramics is alive and well in Texas.

I personally would like to thank the University of Dallas, the Art Department, and my students for allowing me to share my time with you... In organizing the Conference from a local level. Special thanks to my wife Sheryl and Nathalie Souedian, my incredible assistant for the conference. Thanks also to FigDesign for the chance to revisit some of the conference exhibits through this web site. You all were a Godsend!

We regret that we are unable to represent all of the artists who participated at NCECA '98 on this site, but hope that the randomly selected works we show will offer a sense of the vast talent that was present. There were two exhibitions that are not shown on this site that deserved a special recognition: The first was the show at the Dallas Museum of Art, "Clay Traditions". The transition of the integrity and quality from one generation to the next is beautiful. Secondly for the first year the 1st K-12 National Juried Exhibition. The quality of tomorrow's generation is truly remarkable.

NCECA 1998, Fort Worth / DallasEx-Onsite Conference Chair Dan R. Hammett

P.S. If you think that NCECA should make this type of post conference information available on a designated web site please let NCECA know. Contact the office at NCECA, or call 1-866-266-2322.

Exhibitions at NCECA 1998

NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998NCECA Exhibit 1998


Clay Traditions

This exhibition appears in conjunction with the National Council of Education in the Ceramic Arts' (NCECA) 32nd annual conference in Fort Worth, Texas, March 25-28, 1998.  The NCECA conference theme, "Heroes, Icons, History, and Memory," and the overall mission of the organization to promote ceramic education inspired the concept.

The tradition of teaching is woven through the history of ceramics.  Teachers mentor their students, passing down ceramic traditions to the next generation.  These teachers function as guides, providing examples of what can be accomplished over a lifetime.  Though the teacher and artist roles require different characteristics, the instructors in this exhibition have been able to combine the two successfully.  These two generations of artists provide a cross section of contemporary work in clay.  The educators in the exhibition teach at a variety of institutions including state and private universities, art schools, community colleges, craft centers and high schools.  Each has made a meaningful contribution to the tradition of teaching clay.

Lee Akins
Professor of Art
Collin County Community College
Plano, TX

Aileen Horan
Head of Family Education & Community Programs
Dallas Musuem of Art
Dallas, TX

Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998Clay Traditions: Texas Educators and Their Teachers 1998


Alumni Show

1998 Alumni Show1998 Alumni ShowBen Erickson1998 Alumni ShowCavan Gonzales1998 Alumni ShowJuan QuezadaHarding Black

 

Harding Black

Harding BlackPorcelain Bowl with Flame Glaze over Iron SlipHarding BlackPorcelain Vases with Oilspot Glaze TestsPorcelain Vases with Copper Red and Chun Glaze TestsPorcelain Bowl with Crackle GlazeStoneware Bown with Crystalline GlazePorcelain Bowl with Flame Glaze over Iron SlipHarding BlackRed Stoneware Bowl with Rutile Glaze

Sign In
Forgot Password? ×