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University of Dallas

2012 Annual Security Report 

2012 Annual Security Report and Annual Fire Safety Report

Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act

Jeanne Clery Report Campus Fire Safety Right-to-Know

Calendar Year 2012 (January 1, 2012 - December 31, 2012)

 Issued September 28, 2013

 

To the maximum extent possible, the University of Dallas is dedicated to providing a safe and secure environment. This report is required by federal law and contains policy statements and crime statistics for the school. The policy statements address the school’s policies, procedures and programs concerning safety and security, for example, policies for responding to emergency situations and sexual offenses.

 Four years’ worth of statistics are included in this report for certain types of crimes that were reported to have occurred on campus, in or on off-campus buildings or property owned or controlled by the school and on public property within or immediately adjacent to the campus. This report is available online at http://www.udallas.edu/offices/cso. You may also request a paper copy from the Campus Safety Office.

  

 

Timely Warnings:

 

In the event that a situation arises, either on or off campus, that, in the judgment of the Director of the Campus Safety Office (CSO), constitutes an ongoing and continuing threat, a campus-wide "timely warning" will be issued. The warning will be issued through the University’s emergency notification system.

Depending on the particular circumstances of the crime, especially in all situations that could pose an immediate threat to the community and individuals, the Campus Safety Department may also post a notice to provide the university community with notification on the Campus Safety Department website at: http://www.udallas.edu/offices/cso. Anyone with information warranting a timely warning should report the circumstances to the Campus Safety Department by telephone at 972-265-5911 or in person at the Campus Safety Office located in the Haggar Student Center.

 

Emergency Notification:

 

University protocols guide immediate emergency response and evacuation procedures. The protocols require authorized University officials to immediately notify the campus community upon the confirmation of a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health and safety of students or staff occurring on the campus, unless issuing a notification will compromise efforts to contain the emergency. Emergency messages will include information detailing what has occurred and directions to the community regarding what to do next. This emergency notification does not replace the timely warning requirement provided in the previous section. The emergency notification addresses a much wider range of threats (i.e. gas leaks, tornadoes, contagious viruses, etc.)

The University's emergency preparedness, response and evacuation protocols are published online and accessible at http://www.udallas.edu/offices/cso. All students and employees are highly encouraged to read and review these protocols regularly. Code Purple, emergency response and evacuation procedures are tested annually.

The Emergency Management Plan designates CSO as the initial contact for reporting all emergency situations and for response to and resolution of all emergencies. Upon receiving the report of an emergency, the responding officer will determine the appropriate level of response required and will communicate with appropriate personnel at the scene.

  

Emergency Preparedness:

 

Procedures for Testing Emergency Response and Evacuation Procedures

 

An evacuation drill is coordinated by the Campus Safety Department each fall and Spring semester for all campus residential facilities. Thus, the emergency evacuation procedures are tested at least twice each year. Students learn the locations of the emergency exits in the buildings and are provided guidance about the direction they should travel when

exiting each facility for a short-term building evacuation. CSO does not tell residents in advance about the designated long-term evacuations because those decisions are affected by the time of day, location of the building being evacuated, the availability of the various designated emergency gathering locations on campus, and other factors such as the location and nature of the threat. In both cases, CSO and Student Life staff on the scene will communicate information to students regarding the developing situation or any evacuation status changes.

01-18-2012   Fire Drill       Gregory Hall

01-18-2012   Fire Drill       O’Connell Hall

04-13-2012   Fire Drill       New Residence Hall (Now West Hall)

04-13-2012   Fire Drill       Theresa Hall

04-13-2012   Fire Drill       Jerome Hall

04-13-2012   Fire Drill       Madonna Hall

04-13-2012   Fire Drill       Augustine Hall

11/08/2012  Fire Drill       Theresa Hall

11/08/2012  Fire Drill       Jerome Hall

11/08/2012  Fire Drill       O’Connell Hall

11/15/2012   Fire Drill       Madonna Hall

11/15/2012   Fire Drill       Augustine Hall

11/19/2012   Fire Drill       New Residence Hall (Now West Hall)

11/19/2012   Fire Drill       Gregory Hall

The purpose of the drills is to prepare building occupants for an organized evacuation in case of an emergency. All fire drills are unannounced. These evacuation drills are used as a way to educate and train occupants on issues specific to their facility. During the drill, occupants "practice" drill procedures and familiarize themselves with the location of exits and the sound of the fire alarm. In addition to educating the occupants of each building about the evacuation procedures during the drills, the process also provides the University an opportunity to test the operation of the fire alarm system components. Any deficient equipment is noted so that appropriate repairs can be performed.

 Additionally, students receive emergency information and procedures during their hall meetings.

 

Shelter-in-Place Procedures:

 

If an incident occurs and the buildings or areas become unstable, or if the air outdoors becomes dangerous due to toxic or irritating substances, it is usually safer to stay indoors. Leaving the area may create an exposure to danger. Thus, to "shelter-in-place" means to make a shelter of the building students are in, and with a few adjustments this location can be made even safer and more comfortable until it is safe to go outside.

Basic "Shelter-in-Place" Guidance

If an incident occurs and the building students are in is not damaged, students should stay inside and seek an interior room until notification is received that it is safe to come out. If a building is damaged, students should take personal and follow the evacuation procedures for the building (close the door, proceed to the nearest exit, and use the stairs instead of the elevators). Once students have evacuated, they should seek shelter at the nearest University building quickly. If campus safety, police or fire department personnel are on the scene, follow their directions. A shelter-in-place notification may come from several sources utilizing the University's emergency communication tools.

How to "Shelter-In-Place"

No matter where students are, the basic steps of shelter-in-place will generally remain the same. Should the need arise; students should follow these steps, unless instructed otherwise by local emergency personnel:

Students who are inside should stay inside and collect any emergency shelter-in-place supplies and a telephone to be used in case of an emergency. If students are outdoors, they should proceed into the closest building quickly or follow instructions from emergency personnel on the scene.

Students should locate a room to shelter inside. It should be:

 -An interior room;

-Above ground level; and

-Without windows or with the least number of windows. If there is a large group of people inside a particular building, several rooms may be necessary.

Once students have located a room to shelter within, they should do the following:

a.       Shut and lock all windows (tighter seal) and close exterior doors.

b.       Turn off air conditioners, heaters, and fans, if possible.

c.       Close vents to ventilation systems as soon as possible. (University staff will
          turn off ventilation as quickly as possible.)

e.       Turn on a radio, TV, use a smart phone, etc. and listen for further instructions.

  

Security and Access:

 

During business hours, the University (excluding certain housing facilities) will be open to students, parents, employees, contractors, guests, and invitees. During non-business hours access to all University facilities is by key, magnetic ID card, Campus Safety Department, and in the case of housing by Student Life staff. In the case of extended closing periods, prior written approval is required to open University facilities.

Residence halls are secured 24 hours a day. Over extended breaks, the doors of all halls will be secured around the clock, and will be equipped with a lock separate from the ID card access to the resident students. Some facilities may have individual hours, which may vary at different times of the year. Emergencies may necessitate changes or alterations to any posted schedules.

 

Campus Safety Authority and Jurisdiction:

 

The Office of Campus Safety is located on the first floor of the Haggar University Center. The Campus Safety Office employs 10 full-time safety officers who patrol the campus on foot and in vehicles, 24 hours a day, and 7 days a week. Campus Safety’s primary responsibility is to create and maintain a safe and secure work environment for students, faculty, and staff. All Campus Safety Officers are certified in CPR, AED and First Aid

While officers are patrolling campus, a dispatcher staffs the Campus Safety office.  The dispatcher monitors alarm panels and emergency phone lines as well as serve as a source of general information and customer service. Their major responsibility is to direct officers in responding quickly to emergencies and to summon fire, police and emergency medical personnel if needed. 

The Campus Safety Office is responsible for promoting and maintaining community safety and security, enforcement of local, state, and federal laws, and compliance with general university policies.

 Officer presence is the best deterrent to crime and inappropriate behavior. Vehicle and foot patrols by Campus Safety provide that presence.

  

General Procedures for Reporting a Crime or Emergency:

 

Community members, students, staff, faculty, and guests are encouraged to report all crimes and public safety-related incidents to the Campus Safety Department in a timely manner.

Crimes should be reported to the Campus Safety Department to ensure inclusion in the annual crime statistics and to aid in providing timely warning notices to the community, when appropriate.

Campus Safety Department incident reports are forwarded to the Office of Student for review and potential action. Campus Safety officers will investigate a report when it is deemed appropriate. Additional information obtained via the investigation will be forwarded to the Office of Student Life.

 If assistance is required from outside law enforcement agencies, the Campus Safety Department will contact the appropriate agency. If a sexual assault or rape should occur, Campus Safety Department will offer the victim a variety of services.

 Crimes should be reported to the Campus Safety Department to ensure inclusion in the annual crime statistics and to aid in providing timely warning notices to the community, when appropriate.

  

Alcoholic Beverages

The possession, sale, or furnishing of alcoholic beverages on the University of Dallas campus is governed by statements in the Student Handbook and Texas state law. Laws regarding the possession, sale, consumption, or furnishing of alcohol is controlled by the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission (TABC). The enforcement of alcohol laws on campus is the primary responsibility of the Campus Safety Department. The possession, sale, manufacture, or distribution of any controlled substance is illegal under both state and federal laws. Violators may be subject to university disciplinary action, criminal prosecution, and fine and imprisonment (or a combination). It is unlawful to sell, furnish, or provide alcoholic beverages to a person under the age of 21. The possession of alcoholic beverages by anyone less than 21 years of age is illegal. Organizations or groups violating alcohol or drug policies or laws may be subject to sanctions by the university. Clarification regarding alcohol and controlled substances can be found in the Student Handbook.

Illegal Drugs

The University o f Dallas campus has been designated "Drug Free." The unlawful possession, sale, manufacture, or distribution of any controlled substance or paraphernalia is illegal under both state and federal laws. These laws are strictly enforced by the Campus Safety Department. Violators may be subject to University disciplinary action, criminal prosecution, and fine and imprisonment (or a combination). The University reserves the right to employ an outside agency to assist in the detection of illegal drugs, controlled substances and/or drug paraphernalia.

  

Sex Offenses

 Statement of Policy

The University at Dallas is committed to the maintenance of an educational environment which is supportive of its primary educational mission and free from all exploitation and intimidation. Acts of personal and sexual violence are violations of Code of Student Conduct.  The University will not tolerate any form of sexual assault, rape, acquaintance rape, dating violence, domestic violence, stalking or any other form of nonconsensual sexual activity.  Additionally, the University of Dallas is committed to promoting an environment which leads to awareness and prevention of such offenses.

 

Definitions

The University of Dallas considers of the terms below when defining Personal and Sexual Violence:

Rape

Rape is the penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.

Acquaintance Rape

Acquaintance rape involves coercive sexual activities that occur against a person's will by means of force, violence, duress, or fear of bodily injury. These sexual activities are imposed upon the victim by someone they know, such as a friend, date, or acquaintance.

Dating Violence

Dating violence is committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with whom the victim is dating violence. The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on a consideration of the following factors:

You may be experiencing dating violence if the other person:

Domestic Violence

Domestic violence is a pattern of abusive behavior in any relationship that is used by one partner to gain or maintain power and control over another intimate partner.  Domestic violence can be physical, sexual, emotional, economic, or psychological actions or threats of actions that influence another person. This includes any behaviors that intimidate, manipulate, humiliate, isolate, frighten, terrorize, coerce, threaten, blame, hurt, injure, or wound someone. 

Sexual Assault

Sexual assault is any type of sexual contact or behavior that occurs without the explicit consent of the recipient. Falling under the definition of sexual assault are sexual activities as forced sexual intercourse, forcible sodomy, child molestation, incest, fondling, and attempted rape. 

Stalking

Stalking is a pattern of repeated and unwanted attention, harassment, contact, or any other course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to feel fear.

Stalking can include:

Consent

Sexual activity requires consent, which is defined as clear, unambiguous, and voluntary agreement between the participants to engage in specific sexual activity. Consent cannot be inferred from the absence of a "no"; a clear "yes," verbal or otherwise, is necessary. Although consent does not need to be verbal, verbal communication is the most reliable form of asking for and gauging consent, and individuals are thus urged to seek consent in verbal form.

Consent cannot be obtained from someone who is asleep or otherwise mentally or physically incapacitated, whether due to alcohol, drugs, or some other condition. Consent cannot be obtained by threat, coercion, or force. Agreement given under such conditions does not constitute consent.

Consent must be clear and unambiguous for each participant throughout any sexual encounter. Consent to some sexual acts does not imply consent to others, nor does past consent to a given act imply ongoing or future consent. Consent can be revoked at any time.

Personal and Sexual Violence Awareness Program

The University of Dallas Personal and Sexual Violence Awareness Program is coordinated through the Office of Student Life in conjunction with the Office of Campus Safety. The goal of the program is to:

Programs at a Glance…

 

Reporting Options and Procedures

The following explains what options victims have if and when they decide to report an incident of rape, acquaintance rape, dating violence, domestic violence, attempted or completed sexual assault, and stalking. It is always the victim’s choice as to if and how to report.  Reporting does not mean the victim has to press charges or give the name of the perpetrator.  It means help can be provided. Under our campus policies, victims have three paths or options to pursue. 

Informal Report

An informal report means that the victim reports the incident to a University official but does not want the University to investigate for Code of Student Conduct violations.  Informal reports can be filed with and Office of Student Life and Office of Campus Safety. Victims may also report to other University official, such as professors, resident assistants, counselors, coaches or members of the religious community.  All University officials, with the exception of counselors and members of the religious community, are required to report knowledge of violence that occurs on or off campus to the Office of Campus Safety.   Filing an informal report allows these resources to help the victim manage the incident’s effects on the victim’s academic and social functioning.  They can also provide information and confidential support that aide in making decisions about filing a formal report, seeking medical care or counseling. Informal reporting is also important because it allows the Office of Campus Safety to count the incident in the annual crime statistics as well as aide in providing timely warning notices to the community.

Formal Legal Report

The University of Dallas encourages victims to report rape, dating violence, domestic violence, attempted or completed sexual assault, and stalking to the local police.  The Office of Campus Safety, the Director of Student Life or other campus resources can arrange a meeting place for your initial contact with the police.  Victims can request that a representative of the University accompany them in making a police report.

Formal Report with the University

The victim must inform the Director of Student Life in order to initiate an investigation of possible Code of Student Conduct violations.  An internal administrative process determines whether violations of the Code of Student Conduct have occurred.  The administrative team will work on the case as quickly and confidentially as possible. Once it has been determination that Code of Student Conduct violations have occurred, the University will take immediate remedial action to prevent misconduct from recurring.  The University may take any action consistent with the Code of Student Conduct, including but not limited to disciplinary probation, residential separation, suspension from the University or expulsion from the University.

The University will accommodate requests for alternative living, working, and academic arrangements as available and appropriate. This is available with all reporting options in both informal and formal choices of action for both parties.

Retaliatory harassment, occurring either during or after the filing of a personal or sexual violence complaint, is unlawful and in violation of University policy.  If a victim (or his or her family members or others, as appropriate) believes that the victim is being harassed or retaliated against in any way as a result of alleging sexual violence, he or she should immediately notify the Director of Student Life.

Procedures for Institutional Disciplinary Actions 

The Office of Student Life has jurisdiction over all allegations of misconduct brought against University Dallas students.  This jurisdiction extends to allegations that occur on and off-campus, and to allegations brought against all undergraduate and graduate students.  The University will provide a prompt, fair and impartial investigation and resolution of allegations of rape, acquaintance rape, dating violence, domestic violence, attempted or completed sexual assault, and stalking. All investigations are conducted by officials who receive annual training on matters related to personal and sexual violence. All adjudicators are trained on how to conduct a hearing process that protects the safety of the victim and promotes accountability.

  In addition to the procedures set forth in the Code of Student Conduct, the University will adhere to the following procedures in addressing allegations of personal and sexual violence:

As a general rule, the University will not delay its investigation of an allegation of personal and sexual violence due to other criminal investigations or proceedings related to the allegations.  The Director of Student Life may, at the request of law enforcement, temporarily delay the University’s investigation while the police gather evidence, but after such a temporary delay the Director of Student Life will resume his or her investigation of the allegations.  The Director of Student Life will endeavor to complete an investigation within 45 days of when the incident is first reported.  Procedural complexities in investigations of allegations of sexual violence may require additional time and the Director of Student Life will endeavor to complete such investigation within 60 days.

Protective Measures

The University of Dallas takes the matter of rape, dating violence, acquaintance rape, domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking and any form of harassment very seriously.  The Office of Student Life is committed to making sure each member of the community is able to function without fear or intimidation.  Any student or employee found responsible for any of the above forms of sexual assaults may face the following sanctions. 

 

Title IX Statement

The University of Dallas is committed to responding to incidents of sexual misconduct, harassment and gender or sexuality bias incidents in order to eliminate any hostile environment, prevent recurrence of sexual misconduct and address its effects.  Students can seek appropriate remedies to the impact of these kinds of experiences on their educational experience through the University’s Title IX Coordinator to seek appropriate remedies and/or to file a grievance.  The Title IX Coordinator’s office is located on the second floor of Carpenter Hall and the phone number is (972) 721-5382.  The University will help you through any steps you decide to take, while doing its best to protect your privacy and confidentiality. 

 

Your Privacy

Campus Safety investigates all reports of sexual violence that take place on campus. Details, such as time and location, are used as publicly available crime statistics. Identifying information, such as names or residential address of the victim or perpetrator, may not be included in public reports.

 

Written Request

The University will upon request, disclose to the alleged victim of a crime of violence, or non- forcible sex offense, the results of any disciplinary hearing conducted by the university against the student who is the alleged perpetrator of the crime or offense. If the alleged victim is deceased as a result of the crime or offense, the institution will provide the results of the disciplinary hearing to the victim's next of kin, if so requested.

 Recovery and Getting Help 

Victims who report sexual violence will receive written notification of various counseling, mental health, victims advocacy and legal assistance resources available both on-campus and in the community.

On-Campus Support Services

 

Office of Student Life - (972) 721-5323

 

Office of Campus Safety - (972) 265-5911 (emergency) or (972) 721-5305

 

Registrar’s Office – (972) 721-5221
  • Change class schedule
  • Withdrawal or take leave of absence
Human Resources – (972) 721-5382

 

On-Campus Health Services

 

Student Health Clinic - (972) 721-5322

 

Counseling Center

Mike Brock, LPC-S – (214) 364-4154

Mary Armstrong M.A., LCDC – (972) 935-3691

 

Campus Ministry - (972) 721-5168

Counseling and spiritual guidance after a personal and sexual violence has occurred.

 

Off-Campus Health Services

Urgent Care Centers

Valley Ranch Urgent Care Center - (469) 484-4920
Everyday 10am to 8pm

Tienna Health Las Colinas Fast-Trax - (972) 443-5300
M-Th:  7am-7pm, F:  7am-5pm, Sat:  8am-12noon

 

Emergency Rooms/Hospitals

 

Las Colinas Medical Center (ER) - (972) 969-2000

Baylor Medical Center at Irving - (972) 579-8100

 

Other Resources

 

Advocacy Groups

 

Parkland Rape Crisis and Sexual Abuse Center – (214) 590-0430

 Dallas Area Rape Crisis Center

Local Hotline: 972-641-RAPE (7273)

Office: (214) 345-5096

 

RAINN – Rape Abuse & Incest National Network

www.rainn.org/get-information/types-of-sexual-assault

 

Stop Violence Against Women

www.stopvaw.org/Sexual_Assault

 

Office of Civil Rights

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - (800) 368-1019

Aetna Student Health

www.aetnastudenthealth.com/university-administrators/student-assistance-program.aspx

Immediately after a sexual assault

Insure the victim's safety

Call 911 if the victim is in immediate danger.  It is crucial that the victim is safe and is not in a dangerous situation.

 

Immediate Notifications

If the victim is not in immediate danger, the victim should contact CSO at (972) 265-5911. The shift Supervisor will notify the Director of Campus Safety who will issue any special instructions.  If the victim is a student, he/she should also notify the Director of Student Life.                 

 To insure the victim’s privacy, his/her name should only be release to the Director of Campus Safety and/or Director of Student Life.

 

Preserve Evidence

If she/he is considering reporting the incident to the police, whether now, or at some future point, an evidentiary medical exam (“rape kit”) is strongly recommended. This will greatly enhance the likelihood of successful prosecution of the assailant, should the victim report the incident.

To preserve evidence for an examination, a victim:

 

Seek immediate medical treatment

Evidence should be collected within 72 hours of the incident; however, even if 72 hours have elapsed, or if the victim has bathed, etc., an exam is still recommended.  The victim should know that the medical exam does not commit her/him to reporting the attack. In the event that the victim decides not to report to the police, the evidence collected will be destroyed after 30 days.

Note that materials collected as evidence are likely to include some articles of clothing, and/or personal effects.

 

The victim should be helped to the hospital as soon as possible. Remember, not all injuries are immediately apparent. A medical evaluation is necessary to evaluate internal injuries, and for sexually transmitted disease and pregnancy testing, in addition to gathering medical information for the police. The mode of transportation depends on the victim's condition and preference.  The victim has the option of requesting a concealed identity or pseudonym during the investigation and medical examination. In addition, emergency room personnel will call the local rape crisis center so that a counselor can provide support and education.

 

Victim’s Choice

Victims have the option to pursue the University disciplinary charges if the assailant is a University of Dallas student. Sexual assault is a violation of the Student Code of Conduct. Whether the student wants to involve the Irving Police Department or the Office of Student Life, a medical examination is essential. It is always a victim's choice as to whether to report a sexual assault, but reporting an assault (or attempted assault) is extremely important for the protection of both the victim and the community. Reporting an assault does not mean that the victim must prosecute. However, it does begin the legal process if the victim decides to prosecute at a later date.

Click here for more information on Reporting Options and Procedures.

 

Seeking Counseling and Support

If an individual has been sexually assaulted, she/he may experience a wide range of emotions such as shock, denial, fear, depression, anger, guilt, and/or embarrassment. Any of these feelings can occur immediately or may not surface until months, or even years after the assault. Recovery from sexual assault is a long-term process. Immediate support and crisis intervention is always needed. Many times counseling can make a major difference in the sexual assault survivor's eventual psychological adjustment. Obtaining counseling does not obligate a student to report the sexual assault to the police.

Click here for more information onRecovery and Getting Help

 

Violence

 Drug facilitated assault occurs when drugs or alcohol are used to compromise a person’s ability to consent to sexual activity.  Drugs and alcohol are often used to minimize the resistance and memory of a victim of sexual assault. Lack of resistance due to diminished capacity from being under the influence of drugs or alcohol does not constitute as consent.  It is important for victims of sexual assault in these situations do not blame themselves because they drank or did drugs. It is essential to emphasize that it is not his or her fault, that the aggressor is the one who took advantage of his or her diminished capacity.

 

Effects on Genders

Alcohol and drugs tends to have a different effect on men and women.  

The effects for alcohol and drugs might cause men to:

 

Alcohol and drugs might cause women to:

 

Alcohol and Sexual Assault

College campuses are notorious as being places with high levels of alcohol abuse. And, alcohol use is frequently associated with sexual assaults.

 

Facts:

 

Top safety tips for safe drinking:

*http://www.rainn.org/get-information/types-of-sexual-assault/drug-facilitated-assault

 

Drug Facilitated Sexual Assault

Alcohol remains the most commonly used chemical in crimes of sexual assault, but there are also substances being used by perpetrators including: Rohypnol, GHB, GBL, etc.

 

Rohypnol

Rohypnol is a small white tablet that looks a lot like aspirin. It quickly dissolves in liquid and can take effect within 30 minutes of being ingested. The effects peak within 2 hours and may have lingering effects for 8 hours or more. Effects of rohypnol include increased blood pressure, memory impairment, drowsiness, visual disturbances, dizziness, confusion, and unconsciousness.

Street Names: Roofies, Whiteys, Mind Erasers, R-2

 

GHB

Pure GHB is commonly sold as a clear, odorless liquid or white crystalline powder. Because it is made in home labs, the effects are often unpredictable. Once ingested, GHB takes effect in approximately 15 minutes and can last 3-4 hours. Effects of GHB include Sedation of the body, Intense drowsiness, Hampered mobility, verbal incoherence, unconsciousness, Nausea, aspiration on own vomit, Headache, Respiratory failure, Seizure-like activity, Coma, death

Street Names: Grievous Bodily Harm (GBH), Liquid X, Liquid E, G, Easy Lay, Cherry Meth, Soap, Salt Water, Vita G, G-Juice, Somatomax, Bedtime Scoop, Gook, Gamma 10, Energy Drink, and Goop.

 

Benzodiazepines

Benzodiazepines are commonly prescribed as anti-anxiety and sleeping medications in the United States, these drugs can be put into an alcoholic drink or soft drink in powder or liquid form. These are legal forms of Rohypnol. Like the other drugs described above, Benzodiazepines can markedly impair and even abolish functions that normally allow a person to resist, or even want to resist, sexual aggression or assault.

 

Ketamine

Ketamine is a dissociative general anesthetic that has stimulant, hallucinogenic, and hypnotic properties. It is usually used by veterinarians. A fast-acting liquid that can be slipped into drinks. It can be used to sedate and incapacitate individuals in order to sexually assault them. Ketamine is especially dangerous when mixed with other drugs or alcohol. Effects of Ketamine include Dizziness, Confusion, Hallucinations, Disorientation, Impaired motor skills and Loss of consciousness

 

Ecstasy

Ecstasy is a toxic hallucinogenic and stimulant that has psychedelic effects. It is illegal to sell or to produce in the United States. Ecstasy is commonly sold as small pills or capsules and is also available in powder and liquid forms. It can be slipped into an individual's drink in order to facilitate sexual assault

Ecstasy causes individuals to feel extreme relaxation and positivity towards others while it increases sensitivity to touch. When under the influence of ecstasy individuals are less likely to be able to sense danger and it may leave them unable to protect themselves from attack.

Increased blood pressure, pulse, and body temperature, Nausea, Blurred vision, Loss of consciousness, Hallucinations, Chills, and Sweating.

Street Names: E, X, X-TC, M&Ms, Adam, CK, Clarity, Hug Drug, Lover's Speed.xual Violence

Signs of an Abusive Relationship

Abusive relationships can manifest in different ways.  If you've seen or experienced any of the signs listed in the next steps, it is highly likely that you are in an abusive relationship, or one that is about to escalate into an abusive stage.  It is as important to notice these things in a friend's relationship as in your own. Friends stepping in to help prevent an abusive relationship can sometimes be the only way the abused person can see the reality and begin to find ways out.

 

 

Resources for Men

While individuals of both genders are perpetrators of sexual assault, the majority of those who commit sexual assaults are men. Even so, it is important to remember that the vast majority of men are not rapists.

 

There are many things men (and women) can do to help prevent sexual violence.

If you see someone in danger of being assaulted:

Be an ally:

 

If someone you know has been assaulted:

 
Changing the culture:

There are certain things in our culture that make sexual assault more possible. By speaking out and educating ourselves and others, we can help to decrease the number of sexual assaults.

 

Taken from http://www.rainn.org/get-information/sexual-assault-prevention/men-can-help

 

 

Safety Suggestions for Dating

 

 

 

Sex Offender Registration

The Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act (CSCPA) of 2000 is a federal law that provides for the tracking of convicted sex offenders enrolled at or employed by institutions of higher education. The CSCPA is an amendment to the Jacob Wetterling Crimes Against Children and Sexually Violent Offender Act.

A list of all registered sex offenders in Texas is available from the Texas Department of Public Safety at https://records.txdps.state.tx.us/SexOffender/

The University of Dallas is located in Dallas County with a zip code of 75062.

The CSCPA further amends the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) to clarify that nothing in the Act can prohibit an educational institution from disclosing information provided to the institution concerning registered sex offenders.

 

This statement is provided in compliance with the Campus Sex Crimes Act of 2000 and the Sex Offender Registration Program, Chapter 62, Texas Penal Code, effective date September 11, 2005.

In accordance with the Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act of 2000, which amends the Jacob Wetterling Crimes Against Children and Sexually Violent Offender Registration Act, the Jeanne Clery Act, and the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, the University of Dallas Campus Safety Department provides a link to the Texas Department of Public Safety Sex offender Registry. This act requires institutions of higher education to issue a statement advising the campus community where law enforcement information provided by a state concerning registered sex offenders may be obtained. It also requires sex offenders already required to register with a State to provide notice of each institution of higher education in that State at which the person is employed, carries a vocation, or is a student. In the State of Texas, convicted sex offenders must register with the local law enforcement authority in which the offender resides. This information is maintained by the Texas Department of Public Safety.

 

The Texas Department of Public Safety Sex Offender Registry is available via Internet, pursuant to Section 62.005, Texas Penal Code. Registry information provided under this section shall be used for the administration of criminal justice, screening of current or prospective employees, volunteers, or otherwise for the protection of the public in general and children in particular.

The Texas Department of Public Safety is responsible for maintaining this registry. Follow the link below to access the Texas Department of Public Safety website: https://records.txdps.state.tx.us/SexOffender/

 

 Missing Student Protocol:

 

If a member of the University community has reason to believe that a student who resides in on-campus housing is missing, he or she should immediately notify CSO at 972-721-5305. CSO will generate a missing person report and initiate an investigation.

The University requests that all new students voluntarily provide emergency contact information to Residential Living and Learning at the beginning of each year.

The University must notify a custodial parent or guardian within 24 hours of the determination that a student is missing if the student is under the age of 18 and not emancipated. Any additional contact person designated by a student under the age of 18 will also be notified within 24 hours of the determination that the student is missing. The University will notify local law enforcement agencies within 24 hours of a determination that a student is missing unless the local law enforcement agency was the entity that made the determination a student was missing.

 

If a University student living in University-operated housing is suspected to be missing from campus, this information should be immediately reported to a residence hall staff member or the Campus Safety Department (CSO) by the notifying individual. CSO will generate a missing person report and initiate an investigation.

Steps in the process of determining if a student from University-operated housing is missing include the following:

Residential Life personnel will immediately check the assigned room in University-operated housing to determine if the student is present;

Residential Life personnel will attempt to contact the student at all applicable numbers;

Residential Life personnel will contact the Campus Safety Department if none of the above three items result in contacting the student in a reasonable, timely manner;

Residential Life personnel will contact the Emergency Contact designee of the student if advised to do so by CSO.

All reports of missing students made to the residence hall staff and/or CSO will be investigated. If the investigation determines that the student has been missing over 24 hours, the University within the next 24 hours will:

Notify the individual identified as the student's emergency contact person;

Notify a parent or guardian, if the student is under 18 years of age; and

Notify the appropriate law enforcement agency of the determination that a student is missing.

 

Crime Statistics: January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2012

 Under Federal Law, the University must make available crime statistics for certain violent and non-violent crimes that occur on campus.

 

Crime Statistics

Under Federal Law, the University must make available crime statistics for certain violent and non-violent crimes that occur on campus.

Jan 2009- Dec 2009

 

Jan 2010- Dec 2010

 

Murder

0

Murder

0

Negligent Manslaughter

0

Negligent Manslaughter

0

Forcible Sex  Offences

2

Forcible Sex Offences

1

Non Forcible Sex Offences

0

Non Forcible Sex Offences

0

Robbery

0

Robbery

0

Aggravated Assault

0

Aggravated Assault

0

Burglary

2

Burglary

3

Motor Vehicle Theft

0

Motor Vehicle Theft

1

Hate/Prejudice Crimes

0

Hate/Prejudice Crimes

0

Liquor Law Violations

91

Liquor Law Violations

56

Drug Related Violations

0

Drug Related Violations

4

Weapons Possession

0

Weapons Possession

2

 

 

Fires

1

 

 

Fire Alarms

32

 

 

Fire Drills

15

Jan 2011- Dec 2011

 

Jan 2012- Dec2012

 

Murder

0

Murder

0

Negligent Manslaughter

0

Negligent Manslaughter

0

Forcible Sex Offences

1

Forcible Sex Offences

1

Non Forcible Sex Offences

0

Non Forcible Sex Offences

0

Robbery

1

Robbery

0

Aggravated Assault

0

Aggravated Assault

0

Burglary

0

Burglary

2

Motor Vehicle Theft

0

Motor Vehicle Theft

2

Hate/Prejudice Crimes

0

Hate/Prejudice Crimes

0

Liquor Law Violations

173

Liquor Law Violations

115

Drug Related Violations

1

Drug Related Violations

2

Weapons Possession

0

Weapons Possession

1

Fires

0

Fires

0

Fire Alarms

26

Fire Alarms

20

Fire Drills

14

Fire Drills

14

 

 

Arrest Statistics On-Campus for 2009-2012

There were two arrests on campus between 2009 and 2012.  There were four arrests made at Tower Village apartments for 2012.

 Crimes Adjacent to University of Dallas Property for 2012

There were no crimes reported on properties adjacent to the University. There were no crimes reported for the Dallas Area Rapid Transit University of Dallas Station for 2012.

 

 Annual Rome Campus Crime Reports

Foreign campuses owned or controlled by a domestic institution that is covered by the Clery Act will likewise be covered, provided that they have an organized program of study and administrative personnel on campus. Once you determine that such a campus is covered by the Clery Act, the rules for including policy statements and reporting crimes are the same as those that govern your main campus.

Clery Act reportable on-campus property will include:

If the institution also maintains residence halls at such a campus, and those residence halls are located on the campus or immediately adjacent to the campus, Clery Act reportable crimes or arrests or referrals for drugs, alcohol, or weapons that occur in those residence halls must be reported twice; once as on-campus and once as on-campus residential.  If an institution-associated foundation “owns or controls a building or property that is operated in support of, or in relation to, your institution’s educational purposes, your institution is considered to be in control of that building or property.”

The public property requirement covers only public property around on-campus property, not around non-campus property owned or controlled by the institution. For there to be a public property reporting requirement, the public property must be both adjacent to, and accessible from, the on-campus property.  If the campus is surrounded by a fence or other barrier to the public property, or is surrounded by private property, then there is no public property reporting requirement. In addition to reporting requirements, institutions that maintain a distance or overseas campus must also comply with the policy statements, fire reporting (on-campus residence only), [missing persons (on-campus residence only), crime log, emergency notifications and timely warning requirements of the Higher Education Act.

 

If the institution owns or controls property overseas or at a distance, that does not meet the definition of a separate campus but that is frequently used by students, crimes that occur there must be reported in the non-campus property category. Included in this definition is “any building or

Property owned or controlled by an institution that is used in direct support of, or in relation to, the institution’s educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution.” The non-campus property does not include property that is not frequently used by students (e.g., space for back office employees, housing or labs for researchers without students, etc.).

One area that can cause confusion is how to classify crimes that occur on day-long or overnight, college-sponsored trips. Typically, these crimes are not reportable, because they did not occur on property “owned or controlled” by the institution. However, the Department of Education provided some additional clarification on this point, regarding incidents that occur during overseas study programs at hotels or other locations to which students travel (including satellite trips from the main study location). Specifically, the Department wrote:

If the institution has an arrangement to rent or lease space for students in a hotel or other facility then it’s non-campus property. The length of time is not important if it is a formal arrangement. The primary concern is whether a location is frequently used by students. If students are involved in a study abroad program for which there are overnight side trips to various locations and the same hotels or hostels are used on a regular basis, those hotels and hostels fall under the non-campus reporting category regardless of the amount of time each group of students spends there. Additionally, if students stay in one location for an extended amount of time (i.e., more than one night), that location falls under the non-campus reporting category regardless of whether the institution ever houses students there again.

Therefore, according to the clarification, Clery Act crimes are reportable as non-campus incidents if they occur:

 Only crimes that occur during the time in which that hotel or housing company is used by the institution are reportable (e.g. if the institution hosts only a summer trip to Greece, a crime occurring in the winter at that location is not reportable). Also, only crimes in the area that is actually controlled by the institution or that are necessary to access that area is reportable. Thus, if the hotel blocks off the second floor for use by the institution’s students, a crime that occurs in a student’s room, in a public area of the second floor, or in the lobby, elevator, escalator, or stairwell to the second floor is reportable; a crime that occurs on the ninth floor or inside a hotel room not used by a student is not. Additionally, any crime that occurs in a public location accessible to students in the hotel during that time is reportable.

Crimes that occur on trips or in locations that are organized by students, but are not officially organized by the institution are not reportable, as the institution has no agreement to own or control the location in which the crime or incident occurs.

 

Clery Reportable Incidents:

"Clery Act" Crime Definitions from the National Incident-Based Reporting System Edition of the Uniform Crime Reporting Program (FBI)

 

Crime

2013

2012

2011

2010

Aggravated Assault

0

0

0

0

Alcohol Violation

0

0

0

0

Alcohol Violation Residential Area

0

0

0

0

Arson

0

0

0

0

Assault

0

0

0

0

Burglary- Residential

0

0

0

0

Burglary- Motor Vehicle

0

0

0

0

Criminal Homicide (Manslaughter)

0

0

0

0

Criminal Homicide (Murder)

0

0

0

0

Dating Violence

0

0

0

0

Domestic Violence

0

0

0

0

Drug Violation

0

0

0

0

Forcible Sex Offense

0

1

0

0

Non Forcible Sex Offense

0

0

0

0

Robbery

0

0

0

0

Stalking

0

0

0

0

Terroristic threat

0

0

0

0

Weapons Violation

0

0

0

0

 

Annual Fire Safety Report on Student Housing

2012 Campus Fire Safety Right-to-Know:

 

This guide is published annually in compliance with section 485(i) of the Higher Education Opportunity Act, otherwise known as the Campus Fire Safety Right-to-Know Act. All currently registered students as well as employees are directly mailed (via U.S. Postal Service, interoffice campus mail, or email) a notice by October 1 of each year that includes a statement of the report's availability, the exact electronic address at which the report is posted, a brief description of the report's contents, and a statement that the institution will provide a paper copy of the report upon request to the University of Dallas Campus Safety Office.

An electronic version of the report is available at http://www.udallas.edu/offices/cso.

Emergency and Other Important Information

Reporting Emergency:

On campus phones - CSO/Fire/Medical - 5911

Off campus or cellular phones – 972- 265-5911

Fire Log Information/Location:

The Campus Safety Department located in the Haggar Building maintains a fire log that records (according to fire report date) any fire that occurred in an on-campus student housing facility. This log includes the nature, date, time and general location of the fire.  The Fire Log is available for review Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. at the CSO.

Summary of the 2011 Fire Log
 
Fires
0
Fire   Alarms
20
Fire   Drills
14

 

Definitions

(Source: United States Department of Education)

Cause of fire: The factor or factors that give rise to a fire. The causal factor may be, but is not limited to, the result of an intentional or unintentional action, mechanical failure, or act of nature.

Fire: Any instance of open flame or other burning in a place not intended to contain the burning or in an uncontrolled manner.

Fire drill: A supervised practice of a mandatory evacuation of a building for a fire.

Fire-related injury: Any instance in which a person is injured as a result of a fire, including an injury sustained from a natural or accidental cause, while involved in fire control, attempting rescue, or escaping from the dangers of the fire. The term ''person'' may include students, employees, visitors, firefighters, or any other individuals.

Fire-related death: Any instance in which a person is killed as a result of a fire, including death resulting from a natural or accidental cause while involved in fire control, attempting rescue, or escaping from the dangers of a fire; or dies within one year of injuries sustained as a result of the fire.

Fire safety system: Any mechanism or system related to the detection of a fire, the warning resulting from a fire, or the control of a fire. This may include sprinkler systems or other fire extinguishing systems, fire detection devices, stand-alone smoke alarms, devices that alert one to the presence of a fire, such as horns, bells, or strobe lights; smoke-control and reduction mechanisms; and fire doors and walls that reduce the spread of a fire.

 Value of property damage: The estimated value of the loss of the structure and contents, in terms of the cost of replacement in like kind and quantity. This estimate should include contents damaged by fire, and related damages caused by smoke, water, and overhaul; however, it does not include indirect loss, such as business interruption.

On-Campus Student Housing Information On-Campus Student Housing Facilities - Fire Safety Systems

 

All residence halls are located on the main campus of the University of Dallas. The Campus Safety staff monitors the fire protection equipment 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

 A summary of fire protection features provided in each on-campus residential facility is provided below:

  

 

Fire Alarm Monitoring Done On Site (by Control Center)

Full Sprinkler System

Smoke

Fire Extinguisher Devices

Evacuation Plans and Placards

Number of evacuation /fire drills each year

Augustine Hall

X

X

X

X

X

2

Gregory Hall

X

NS

X

X

X

2

Jerome Hall

X

X

X

X

X

2

Madonna Hall

X

X

X

X

X

2

New Residence Hall

X

X

X

X

X

2

O’Connell Hall

X

NS

X

X

X

2

University Apartments

NS

NS

X

X

X

0

Theresa Hall

X

X

X

X

X

2

 

N/A = Not applicable        NS = No System X= Safety Systems in Place

  

Fire Safety Education and Training:

 Basic fire safety instruction is provided to students during hall meetings at the beginning of each fall and spring semester. Residence hall staff members receive additional intensive and comprehensive fire safety training each fall. Fire Extinguisher training is offered to faculty, staff and students when requested. 

Fire Safety Protocols:

To minimize the potential of fires, the University prohibits unauthorized open burning and the use of combustible decorations at all times within the residential facilities. Examples of open burning include, but not limited to: candles, incense, bonfires, campfires, barbecue grills, and their related accessories such as gasoline, propane, lighter fluid, charcoal, and pyrotechnics. All decorations and ornaments must consist of fire-resistant or non-combustible material. Decorations should not be posted on any fire protection equipment such as hose cabinets, smoke detectors, fire sprinkler heads or associated piping, fire alarm pull boxes, on or near exits or emergency lights, or exit signs. Decorative lights including holiday lights, as well as floodlights, extension cords, or electrically operated ornaments must be U.L. rated and approved for use.

Residents are not permitted to possess any of the following:

Portable space heaters, barbeque grills, hibachis, smokers (gas, electric, charcoal), and related accessories including lighter fluids and lighters, and other similar type products (for cooking/warming purposes); candles, incense sticks, and related accessories; hot plates, slow cookers, deep fryers, electric skillets, electric woks, griddles, toaster ovens, rice cookers, convection ovens, fireworks, firecrackers, rockets, flares, sparklers, and other devices, or non-fire retardant artificial trees.

Electrical appliances which are not in excellent working condition are not permitted in the residence halls. The Student Life staff reserves the right to inspect all electrical items at any time to determine the safety of each appliance or item.

Electrical cords must be free of all flaws. It is the student's responsibility to ensure that all permissible electrical items are in safe and operable condition. All electrical cords must be disconnected during school breaks and/or when University Housing is officially closed.

Any of these appliances found during routine inspections must be removed immediately. Any second incidents will result in administrative and/or disciplinary action. Students should be aware items not included in the above list may also be prohibited. Students should check with their Residential Coordinator before bringing an unlisted item into University Housing. The electrical systems in University residential facilities have definite limitations. Overloading these systems can present fire and safety hazards. Heavy-duty, single-outlet surge protectors no more than six (6) feet long are permissible. However, other types of extension cords (light duty; gang outlets, etc.) are not allowed.

 Any resident found to be exceeding the electrical capacity of their room/apartment will have restrictions placed on their use of the electrical system.

 Firearms, knives, arrows, bows, paintball guns, air soft guns, sling shots, spear guns, or any other weapon(s) and ammunition are not allowed in University Housing or anywhere else on University property; however, small pocket knives and table knives are allowed Possession of such items is considered to be a serious infraction. Students who fail to uphold this standard are subject to administrative and/or disciplinary action which will include removal from University Housing. The possession and/or detonation of any explosive device, including all forms of fireworks, are strictly prohibited. Possession/use of such items is considered to be a serious infraction of the University Student Code of Conduct and state law. Students who fail to uphold this code are subject to disciplinary action which may include removal from University Housing as well as a referral to Campus Safety Department for possible criminal prosecution.

The lighting and burning of candles, incense, potpourri, cigarettes or anything requiring an open flame is prohibited in any residential facility. Violations may result in administrative and/or disciplinary action.

Residents are expected to comply with these guidelines. Those who fail to do so will be subject to action by Student Life. This may include but is not limited to confiscation of unauthorized property, official administrative and/or disciplinary action to Campus Safety Department.

Any individual who fails to evacuate a building after a fire alarm has sounded may be subject to appropriate administrative and/or disciplinary action.

Any individual who misuses or tampers with fire protection equipment (smoke detectors, pull stations, fire alarms, fire extinguishers or automatic door closers) may be subject to University administrative and/or disciplinary action in addition to being assessed a monetary charge for the cost of repair or replacement of misused or damaged equipment, cleaning of the facility and damage to other property. In addition, tampering with fire protection equipment is a felony offense under State law and may be prosecuted as such.

Any fires that were quickly extinguished or any evidence of recent fires must be reported immediately to a Resident Coordinator staff member or the Campus Safety Department 972-721-5305 who will document the incident as required and perform a follow-up investigation. Additional campus fire safety information can be found at the following address: http://www.udallas.edu/offices/cso/fire_safety.html

 

Fire Drill and Evacuation Procedures

Emergency evacuation drills are conducted each fall and spring semester. Residential Living and Learning staff members use the drills to both educate and remind the residents of the proper evacuation procedure and to survey the facility for any non-functional devices.

 

Fire Safety Inspection Program

University of Dallas conducts several levels of fire and life safety inspections in all of the residence hall and apartment facilities.

Periodic Inspections - Representatives from the Irving Fire Marshall’s office and CSO inspect each building to identify potential deficiencies with emergency lighting, exit signs, corridor obstructions, electrical issues, etc. Depending on the deficiency identified and the Facilities Department will respond and correct the concern in a timely manner.

Pre-Occupancy Inspections - Prior to occupancy of residence halls each fall, spring and summer semester, an in-depth inspection is conducted. These inspections include all common areas, mechanical, electrical, and custodial areas within each building as well as exit paths outside of the facilities.

Post-Occupancy Inspections - After each spring semester unoccupied rooms are inspected by the Student Life staff and the Facilities Department to ensure any fire and life safety deficiencies are noted and corrected in a timely manner.

Random Room Inspections - A representative from the Office of Student Life performs random inspections of occupied rooms to evaluate the level of compliance to recognized Fire Code and Residential Guide to Community Living. The intent of these inspections is to increase the level of safety and safety awareness for all occupants of the residence halls. Advance notification of all inspections will be provided to hall staff. These inspections include the review of the following items:

Electrical: Use of extension cords, cover plate missing/damaged, electrical wiring frayed/damaged/crimped, multi adapter without breaker in use, prohibited/ unapproved appliances

Fire Alarm Equipment: smoke detector obstructed (min. 24" clearance), smoke detector damaged

Fire Sprinkler Equipment: storage within 18" of sprinkler head or other obstruction

Lofts: being less than 30" from the ceiling, being of poor construction and/or being placed in an unsafe/unapproved location

Ignition Sources/Combustible Products: candles/incense being present in the room, flammable liquids in the room, combustible materials near electrical source, and excessive fire load in the room

Emergency Planning: absence of the evacuation plan on the back of the room door, window/door obstructed

Miscellaneous: poor housekeeping, floor/wall/ceiling penetrations, and the door closure missing/damaged

  

Public Access Defibrillator Program:

University of Dallas has installed approximately 10 automated external defibrillators (AEDs) throughout campus buildings. CSO inspects and maintains each unit. Defibrillators will provide a lifesaving electrical shock to victims in cardiac arrest, and can be operated without any training or previous experience. However, AED and CPR training opportunities are available through the CSO by attending a scheduled class or upon request. CSO vehicles also carry the devices during patrol in order to provide a timely response. 

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