Course Descriptions

Choose from a broad array of courses.

The Master of American Studies requires 30 hours of course work selected from the following list of courses and a comprehensive examination.  Students are advised (and will be actively advised by the American Studies graduate director) to take a broad array of courses both with respect to department or discipline and temporally. Students may petition to have additional courses from English, History, and Politics, as well as from other departments such as Art, Classics, Economics, Theology, and Philosophy, counted toward their American Studies degree. No thesis or foreign language is required.

English Courses 

  • English 5319. Classical Epic.
  • English 5352. Augustan Literature.
  • English 5323. Modern Southern Literature.
  • English 6333. Milton.
  • English 6336. Thomas More
  • English 6337. Pope, Swift, and Their Circle
  • English 6338. The Age of Johnson
  • English 6361. Faulkner.
  • English 6362. Hawthorne and Melville.
  • English 6364. Liberty in Literature.
  • English 6369. Henry James.
  • English 6370. Conrad.
  • English 7316. Shakespeare's Histories.
  • English 7352 English Romanticism
  • English 7366. Modern Fiction.

History Courses

  • History. Seventeenth-Century America.
  • History. Eighteenth-Century America.
  • History. The Scottish Enlightenment.
  • History. Age of Jefferson.
  • History. Age of Jackson.
  • History. The Civil War.
  • History. America 1880–1920.
  • History. America since 1920.
  • History. American Catholic I & II.
  • History. American South.
  • History. American Intellectual History.
  • History. American Women's History.

Politics Courses 

  • Politics 530X. The Enlightenment and Liberal Democracy.
  • Politics 530X. The American Founding.
  • Politics 530X. Politics and Parties.
  • Politics 530X. Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau.
  • Politics 530X. Progressivism.
  • Politics 530X. 20th Century Political Thought and Policy.
  • Politics 530X. Modernity and Post-Modernity.
  • Politics 7376. Aristotle's Politics.
  • Politics 6312. Plutarch, Augustine, Machiavelli.
  • Politics 6321. Lincoln.
  • Politics 6323. Constitutional Law.
  • Politics 6326. The Presidency.
  • Politics 6327. Civil Rights.
  • Politics 6328. Congress.
  • Politics 6377. Federalist/ Anti-Federalist.

American Studies Courses

  • 6351. Directed Reading.
  • 6377, 6378, 6379. Special Studies.
    • Courses offered according to student interest and faculty availability.
  • 6V99. Graduate Reading.
    • Registration for this non-credit course indicates that the student is involved full-time in studies necessary for the completion of degree requirements. At the end of each course the student must demonstrate progress. Normally, Master’s students are limited to a total of two Reading courses. A ma­triculation fee is required. This fee entitles the student to the use of the library and other basic services.

News

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