Modern Language Concentrations

Modern Language Concentrations

Coordinator: Dr. Jacob-Ivan Eidt - jieitdt@udallas.edu

A language concentration is the perfect complement to any major, allowing students to pursue their interests in Spanish, French, German or Italian at the advanced level while completing a major in another field. It includes advanced work in one or more foreign languages, together with the theoretical consideration of language as a universal human activity. (Students majoring in one language may also concentrate in a second language.)
Students take a total of four courses (12 credits):

  1. Three courses (9 credits) in language/literature at the 3000-level or above. Usually these three courses are in the same language, although they do not have to be. (Spanish concentrators are expected to take Advanced Spanish Composition as one of the three.)
  2. One course (3 credits) involving a theoretical consideration of language. The following courses are recommended:

 

  • Edu 5354 Introductory Linguistics
  • MCT 3330 Historical Linguistics
  • Phi 4335 Philosophy of Language
  • Psy 3334 Language and Expression

With permission of the coordinator a fourth language/literature course may be substituted for the theoretical course.

How to Declare a Language Concentration

You declare your intention to concentrate by going to see the Language Concentration Coordinator, Dr. Jacob-Ivan Eidt, in person in his office, Anselm 111. Going to see the Coordinator can be useful for two other reasons as well: 1) He can (and in some cases will) approve course substitutions; 2) he can answer some of your questions.
For questions about what language courses are best suited for you, the following persons will be glad to help you: José Espericueta [Spanish], Jason Lewallen [French], Jacob-Ivan Eidt [German] or Anthony Nussmeier [Italian]

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