The Core in Rome

Most of our students spend a semester abroad studying Western Civilization at UD's Due Santi campus just south of Rome, Italy. It's where UD's Core curriculum comes together.

Donald Cowan“ To be a student of the Western World to seek one's heritage in the liberal arts is to follow the path to Rome. ”- Donald B. Cowan, UD President (1962-77)

Coloseum

This program is unlike most study-abroad programs; it offers students an opportunity to experience firsthand the roots of our culture. While in Rome, students take Western Civilization I, Art and Architecture of Rome, Western Theological Tradition, The Human Person, and Literary Tradition III.

Students read about Julius Caesar and Agamemnon one day and find themselves immersed in the actual places of these histories and myths the next. They travel across seas and landscapes where major battles were decided; they recite Greek tragedies in the theaters where they were originally performed; they come face to face with works of art and architecture that have inspired humankind for centuries; and they visit some of the holiest shrines and most beautiful monuments of the Roman Catholic Church.

News

The Idea of Our University

To found the famous Core curriculum of the University of Dallas, as an education "best for the individual," Donald and Louise Cowan looked to John Henry Newman's The Idea of a University. He unapologetically promotes the Western classics -- precisely because so few know our own culture well enough to appreciate the depth of any other.

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To Russia with UD: Faculty to Lead UD's First Tour of Russia

This summer, the University of Dallas invites students, alumni, faculty and staff to join its first-ever tour abroad of Russia, led by Professor of Physics Richard Olenick and Affiliate Instructor of Spanish, French and Italian Irina Rodriguez. From June 8 to June 16, 2020, Olenick and Rodriguez will guide participants through the cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg, taking them on a cultural and literary tour of the "Russian soul."

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Cowan-Blakley Memorial Library Showcases Rare Books Room

No longer relegated to the damp lower level, the Cowan-Blakley Memorial Library's Rare Books Room has for the past two years occupied a prime spot on the second floor, where there used to be study carrels. The room, made of glass walls, is normally locked and only opened by appointment, but on Sept. 26, the library hosted an open house for faculty and staff to come and examine these treasures.

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