Classics Department Experiences Sudden Surge in Interest, Scholarship Application

Classics Department Experiences Sudden Surge in Interest, Scholarship Application

Kat Cammack, BA '19, claims that the study of classics encompasses all of her skills and interests.

"I read the most gorgeous works of literature ever written, solve puzzles, analyze history through psychological and philosophical lenses, study monumental art and grow familiar with the thinkers who formed the basis of Western thought, all while exponentially improving my grasp of the English language," she said.

She doesn't seem to be the only one who feels this way. In a world where technology is prominent and it can sometimes feel like were living in a science fiction story, 19 of these incoming college freshmen who likely don't remember a time without cell phones and computers applied for and were awarded departmental scholarships in classics. Ten of these students will be starting at UD in the fall.

"Last year we had six applicants," said Associate Professor and Department Chairman of Classics David Sweet. "Other departments are also having success this year. One wonders what has made the difference between the two years."

According to Lucas Preble, campus visit coordinator, the Office of Undergraduate Admission staff has been working hard to promote departmental scholarships such as these in all of their interactions and communications with prospective students. Last year there were a total of 83 applicants for nine departments, and this year there were 108. There were also more applicants to UD in general, with UD now preparing to welcome the largest freshman class in its history: 400 students.

Still, in order for these students to be recruited and encouraged to apply for a classics scholarship, they must have experience and interest in classics to begin with, like Cammack, who was first introduced to basic ecclesiastical Latin nine years ago and has been enthralled ever since.

Cammack learned about UD though college books such as Joseph A. Esposito's Choosing a Catholic College: What to Look for and Where to Find It; she then attended UD's Latin in Rome program in the summer of 2013 and visited the Irving campus in the fall of 2013, both of which cemented her decision to apply only to UD, a decision she says she has not once regretted.

"I'm thrilled to immerse myself in Latin again, to begin Greek and to explore all the DFW area has to offer," Cammack said.

PHOTO: Kat Cammack (pictured with her Roman patron saint)

 

 

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