Hazing

Hazing Policy

Hazing is defined as any intentional, knowing or reckless act occurring on- or off-campus committed by one or more persons that endangers another student’s mental or physical health or safety. This includes, but is not limited to, actions for the purpose of pledging, being initiated into, affiliated with, holding office in or maintaining membership in any organization whose members are or include students.

1. Examples of hazing include but are not limited to:

  1. Requiring new members to perform unnecessary duties not assigned to existing members
  2. Sleep deprivation
  3. Required “greeting” of members in a specific manner when seen on campus
  4. Required carrying of certain items
  5. Required walking in groups to class, the cafeteria, etc.
  6. Restriction of communication
  7. Yelling or screaming
  8. Personal servitude or chores
  9. Wearing of embarrassing or uncomfortable clothing
  10. Assigning pranks such as stealing, painting objects, or harassing other organizations
  11. Forced confinement
  12. Capturing or kidnapping
  13. Total or partial nudity
  14. Pushing, shoving, tackling, or any other physical contact
  15. Forced consumption of any liquid or food
  16. Any activity that intimates or threatens a student with ostracism that adversely affects the mental health or dignity of a student or discourages the student from entering or remaining at the University.

2. A student commits an offense if the student:

  1. Engages in hazing,
  2. Solicits, encourages, directs, aids or attempts to aid another in the act of hazing, 
  3. Intentionally, knowingly or recklessly permits hazing to occur or
  4. Has firsthand knowledge of the planning or attempt of a specific hazing incident involving a student and fails to report this information to the Director of Student Affairs or other appropriate official.

3. An organization commits an offense if:

  1. The organization condones or encourages hazing or
  2. An officer or any combination of members or alumni of the organization commits or assists in the commission of hazing.

Hazing is a violation of Texas law and the University Of Dallas Student Code Of Conduct. Instances of hazing should be reported to University of Dallas Police Department or the Director of Student Affairs.
Students who commit hazing can be held accountable by the University through its disciplinary process as well as by the state through the legal system. The sanction for violating the hazing policy may include suspension or expulsion from the University. Criminal penalties for hazing can include:

  1. Failing to report hazing: fine up to $1,000 and/or up to 180 days in jail
  2. Hazing not resulting in serious bodily injury: fine of $500-$1,000 and/or 90-180 days in jail
  3. Hazing resulting in serious bodily injury: fine of $1,000-$5,000 and/or 180 days-one year in jail
  4. Hazing resulting in death: fine of $5,000-$10,000 and/or 1-2 years in jail
  5. Except where the hazing results in death, the student may be required to perform community service in lieu of confinement to jail

The complete hazing law enacted by the Texas legislature may be viewed in its entirety at the "Texas Legislature Online" Web site at: http://www.legis.state.tx.us/ and select the "Statute" search. Information about hazing may be found in the Texas Education Code, Chapter 37, sections 37.151 through 37.157 and Chapter 51, section 51.936.

During the first 3 weeks of each semester students will receive a summary of state law related to hazing and a list of organizations disciplined for hazing or convicted for hazing on or off campus in the preceding 3 years.

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