Centers

Centers & Projects

The University of Dallas is associated with a number of centers and projects that are devoted to a deeper exploration of topics closely connected with the University's mission.

American Public Philosophy Institute

Their mission is to promote natural law public philosophy rooted in the principles of the American Founding – one that pursues freedom and prosperity, grounded on the moral integrity of the culture and of our social and political institutions.

Center for Christianity and the Common Good 

A forum for serious and informed discussion of the common good which brings to bear upon this discussion the insight and wisdom of the Christian intellectual tradition.

Center for Thomas More Studies

To promote the study of Thomas More, especially his understanding of liberty,  statesmanship, and the need for educated and virtuous citizens.

Dallas Medieval Texts and Translations

A book series of medieval Latin texts with English translations, edited at UD and published by Peeters of Louvian (Belgium).

Leo XIII Center for Philosophy and Social Issues

A nonprofit corporation dedicated to fostering an understanding of contemporary social-political issues informed by the perennial wisdom of Western philosophy and the intellectual heritage of Christian social teaching.

North Texas Heidegger Symposium

Professor Richard Owsley founded the North Texas Heidegger Symposium in 1980, and hosted it for over twenty years.

News

Dignifying Humanity

Standing on the edge of border America, Diocese of El Paso Bishop Mark J. Seitz, BA '76, serves a role of vital importance as the pastor of a community divided by the United States-Mexico border. "Recently we have witnessed indefensible, hateful words toward our neighbors in Mexico, the demonization of migrants, and destructive language about our border," Seitz wrote in his July pastoral letter titled "Sorrow and Mourning Flee Away," earning him national attention amid significant upheaval of immigration rights.

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The Rome Experience: Tracing Western Civilization

During this semester's trip to Greece, UD's Romers toured the ruins of one of history's most famous military engagements -- the Battle of Marathon -- dating back to 490 B.C. The trip marked the first visit to Marathon in decades for the Rome Program. "Our visit there was long overdue," said Peter Hatlie, vice president, dean, director, and professor of classics on the Rome campus.

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