Concentrations

Concentrations in Classics

A language concentration is a good complement to any major, including that in another language (students majoring in one language may concentrate in another). It includes advanced work in one or more foreign languages and a theoretical study of language as a universal human activity.

In what follows, by "course" is meant a 3-credit course, and by "advanced" is meant 3000-level or above. For all questions or substitutions, please contact Dr. David Sweet, the Chair of Classics.

Types of Classics Concentrations

Classics

Four advanced courses in any combination of Greek and Latin.

Concentration in Greek or Latin

  • Four advanced courses in Greek, or
  • Four in Latin, or
  • Three advanced courses in either language plus one "theoretical" course, e.g. CLA 3330 Historical Linguistics or PHI 4335 Philosophy of Language. In place of the one theoretical course, you may substitute two lower-division courses in the other language, e.g., 1301-1302, or 2311-2312.

For any other substitutions, the permission of the Concentration Director is required.

Area Studies: Biblical Greek

  • Five courses, namely: CLG 2315 Intermediate Greek, CLG 3334 Biblical Greek Readings, CLG 3335 Patristic Greek, and two approved advanced courses in Scripture.

Area Studies: Greek

  • Five courses, namely, three advanced Greek courses and two related courses (for which the Classics Chairman's approval is required); e.g. CLA 3301 Fundamentals of Rhetoric, CLA 4340 Classical Mythology, HIS 3303 Ancient Greece, PHI 3325 Ancient Philosophy, POL 3311 Thucydides, or POL 3331 Plato's Republic.

Area Studies: Latin

  • Five courses, namely, three advanced Latin courses and two related courses (for which the Classics Chairman's approval is required); e.g. CLA 3301 Fundamentals of Rhetoric, CLA 4340 Classical Mythology, HIS 3304 The Roman Republic, or HIS 3305 The Roman Empire.

 

 

Background photo: Delphi © 2015 by Rebecca Deitsch, BA '17

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